Hammer & Hand http://hammerandhand.com INCITING EVOLUTION IN BUILDING THROUGH SERVICE, CRAFT AND SCIENCE. Mon, 27 Jul 2015 22:50:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Sneak peek at graphics for “Evolution of Enclosure” exhibit http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/sneak-peek-at-graphics-for-evolution-of-enclosure-exhibit/ http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/sneak-peek-at-graphics-for-evolution-of-enclosure-exhibit/#comments Fri, 24 Jul 2015 19:56:25 +0000 http://hammerandhand.com/?p=6992 With the First Thursday exhibit opening party fast approaching for “Evolution of Enclosure,” we’re now in the final push of production. H&H’s Jason Woods is finishing up four beautiful wall assembly cross sections to provide a 3d representation of the principles of high performance building; illustrator Ryan Sullivan of Paste In Place has completed his... Read more »

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With the First Thursday exhibit opening party fast approaching for “Evolution of Enclosure,” we’re now in the final push of production.

H&H’s Jason Woods is finishing up four beautiful wall assembly cross sections to provide a 3d representation of the principles of high performance building; illustrator Ryan Sullivan of Paste In Place has completed his suite of graphics for the exhibit; and graphic designer Jen Sliker is pulling it all together into a striking series of exhibit panels. The exhibit will feature built work designed by Holst Architecture, Scott | Edwards Architecture, SHED Architecture & Design, and The Miller Hull Partnership.

We’ll unveil it all at the party at AIA Portland’s Center for Architecture on August 6, 6-8pm (and if you’re reading this, you are invited to the festivities!). But I thought I’d give you a sneak peek at a small sampling of the graphics…

Here’s one, based on data shared by Architecture 2030, showing that the building sector is currently a big part of our climate problem:

Buildings are part of the climate problem

Here’s another, showing our high performance wall assembly at Madrona Passive House and how it manages for heat, air, and moisture:

Madrona Passive House wall assembly analysis

And here’s a third, adapted with permission from a graphic by The Miller Hull Partnership, showing how building performance and solar array size are intertwined in Net Positive Energy projects:

Bullitt Center solar array and net positive energy building

Please join us at the Exhibit Opening to see more!

P.S. We’ll also be unveiling the winners of the perFORM 2015 Building Design Competition at the First Thursday party. Exciting stuff.

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Opening Party for H&H’s AIA Exhibit, “Evolution of Enclosure” – First Thursday (August 6) http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/evolution-of-enclosure-exhibit-opening-august-6-aia-portland/ http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/evolution-of-enclosure-exhibit-opening-august-6-aia-portland/#comments Thu, 16 Jul 2015 23:17:43 +0000 http://hammerandhand.com/?p=6965 Come celebrate the opening of Hammer & Hand’s high performance building exhibit at AIA Portland. We now have the science and techniques to build for comfort, health, and revolutionary efficiency. At the center of it all is the advanced building envelope. Join AIA Portland and Hammer & Hand for this exhibit of cutting-edge building praxis.... Read more »

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Come celebrate the opening of Hammer & Hand’s high performance building exhibit at AIA Portland.

We now have the science and techniques to build for comfort, health, and revolutionary efficiency. At the center of it all is the advanced building envelope. Join AIA Portland and Hammer & Hand for this exhibit of cutting-edge building praxis. Drawing on built projects in Portland and Seattle designed by four leading NW architecture firms, the exhibit will explore the building science that guides high performance assemblies.

Evolution of Enclosure: the Anatomy of Building Performance
Exhibit Opening Party, August 6, 6-8pm
Wine and Refreshments
AIA Portland, 403 NW 11th Ave, Portland
(Exhibit runs August 6 through September 10 at AIA Portland)

Evolution of Enclosure Exhibit

Four full-scale wall assembly cross sections, a suite of building science of illustrations, project photography, and an interactive set of high performance building animations will show how buildings can go from net consumers of energy to net producers: part of the climate solution.

The exhibit Opening Party will also include the unveiling of the winning entries of the perFORM 2015 Building Design Competition.

See you on August 6!

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Randy Gragg joins perFORM 2015 jury http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/randy-gragg-joins-perform-2015-jury/ http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/randy-gragg-joins-perform-2015-jury/#comments Tue, 07 Jul 2015 21:53:19 +0000 http://hammerandhand.com/?p=6955 Longtime Portland architecture critic and advocate Randy Gragg has joined the perFORM 2015 Building Design Competition jury. Now director of University of Oregon’s John Yeon Center (see this post about our tour of Yeon’s Watzek House), Randy is joined on the jury by Portland architects Carrie Strickland (Works Partnership Architecture) and Cory Hawbecker (Holst Architecture),... Read more »

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Longtime Portland architecture critic and advocate Randy Gragg has joined the perFORM 2015 Building Design Competition jury. Now director of University of Oregon’s John Yeon Center (see this post about our tour of Yeon’s Watzek House), Randy is joined on the jury by Portland architects Carrie Strickland (Works Partnership Architecture) and Cory Hawbecker (Holst Architecture), University of Oregon professor Peter Keyes (perFORM 2015 Advisor), Seattle architects Jim Graham (Graham Baba Architects) and Gladys Ly-Au Young (Sundberg Kennedy Ly-Au Young Architects), and Hammer & Hand’s Sam Hagerman. For bios and pictures of jurors, visit the perFORM 2015 jury page.

The jury will deliberate later this month at a session to be held in the Glasswood Building, site of Hammer & Hand’s commercial Passive House retrofit. The group will evaluate fifty submissions by architecture students and interns from across North America, representing two dozen universities and many private firms.

perform-blog

This year’s competition challenged participants to design a net zero energy midrise building in Portland’s urban core. The submission swill be judged based on the criteria of resourcefulness, replicability, and beauty. The jury will award $6000 among winning entries.

perFORM 2015 winners will be announced at a ceremony at AIA Portland on First Thursday, August 6, as part of the launch of Hammer & Hand’s high performance building exhibit there, entitled “Evolution of Enclosure.”

Stay tuned!

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Solar Energy and the Black Swan http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/solar-energy-and-the-black-swan/ http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/solar-energy-and-the-black-swan/#comments Mon, 06 Jul 2015 17:00:07 +0000 http://hammerandhand.com/?p=6940 In his book, “The Black Swan: the Impact of the Highly Improbable,” Nassim Nicholas Taleb describes how the world has been shaped by a series of massive shifts in established systems: change events that virtually no one saw coming. “The way things have always been” suddenly gets turned on its head. Taleb makes the case that our... Read more »

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In his book, “The Black Swan: the Impact of the Highly Improbable,” Nassim Nicholas Taleb describes how the world has been shaped by a series of massive shifts in established systems: change events that virtually no one saw coming. “The way things have always been” suddenly gets turned on its head. Taleb makes the case that our assumption that established systems will persist indefinitely makes us blind to the possibility of potentially earth-shattering changes, like the fall of the Berlin Wall or the attacks of 9/11.

Taleb uses the life of the turkey to illustrate the point:

Life of a turkey as lesson for energy markets and disruption of solar power

Graphs like this are sometimes cited to warn of things like ecosystem collapse. And when we think of the Black Swan and the climate crisis we can be forgiven for dwelling on the negative. But Black Swan events also describe positive change.

Take a look at this jaw-dropping graph from a report by the investment bank Sanford Bernstein, for example:

Sanford Bernstein: Solar energy prices dropping

The wavering lines across the bottom of the graph show the price of fossil fuel-generated energy. The dive-bombing line at the right shows the price of solar energy falling from the sky out of nowhere, very much like a Black Swan. Solar energy is suddenly giving dirty energy a run for its money.

This graph below by Brian McConnell shows the same thing, but with a logarithmic y-axis that visually flattens the game-changing drop in solar price.

Dropping solar prices to disrupt fossil fuels

It looks like solar energy will disrupt energy markets and conventional dirty energy production very soon.

You know how computer chip innovation is described by “Moore’s Law,” that says that the size of chip transistors halves every 18 months? Here’s what that does to the price of computing power:

Moore's Law and price of transistors

Like computer chips (and unlike oil) solar energy is a technology. So innovation can be a big deal. It turns out that solar panel price follows something akin to Moore’s Law, called “Swanson’s Law,” that says that solar panel price decreases by 20% for every doubling of global manufacturing capacity. Here’s what that’s doing to the price of solar energy:

Swanson's Law and solar pv price

We’re seeing similar decreases in wind power and battery cost, too. (Have you noticed what Elon Musk is up to lately?)

Now I know I’m mixing world views here: one (the Black Swan) saying we’re unwise to predict the future based on the past, and the other (Swanson’s Law) saying that we’re safe to assume that future drops in solar energy costs will continue along past trajectories.

But here’s my point: we’re in game-changing, system-disrupting, exponential growth territory with renewable energy right now. As we contemplate the 59% reduction in global CO2 emissions that the International Energy Agency says is necessary by 2050 to limit warming to 2 degrees C, this provides some hope.

For more musings about renewables, climate change, and how they relate to high performance buildings, check out these posts:

Is Solar Smart? Reaching Net Zero, Part I

On the Jevons Paradox, Climate, and Fighting Defeatism

(Black Swan photo by Kiril Krastev, some rights reserved under a creative commons license.)

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Lake Oswego Historic Iron Worker’s Cottage Preservation http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/lake-oswego-historic-iron-workers-cottage-preservation/ http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/lake-oswego-historic-iron-workers-cottage-preservation/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 17:00:07 +0000 http://hammerandhand.com/?p=6751 While we love building modern high performance structures and updating homes, part of our work that will always be close to our hearts is helping to preserve historic buildings. One such project was the preservation of the Historic Iron Worker’s Cottage in Lake Oswego. The City of Lake Oswego purchased the cottage in 2003 in... Read more »

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While we love building modern high performance structures and updating homes, part of our work that will always be close to our hearts is helping to preserve historic buildings. One such project was the preservation of the Historic Iron Worker’s Cottage in Lake Oswego.

The City of Lake Oswego purchased the cottage in 2003 in order to preserve one of the last remaining examples of factory worker housing in Oregon. Estimated to have been built in the 1870s or 1880s, it was constructed to house workers of the Oswego Iron Company. In 2011 the City began a three-phase preservation plan.

Lake Oswego Historic Iron Workers Cottage Before Restoration | Hammer & HandBefore: Lake Oswego Historic Iron Workers Cottage Pre-Restoration. Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Hammer & Hand was proud to be part of the restoration and preservation of this historical site. Work done by H&H included repairing exterior siding, replacing windows and porches, and repairing the chimney.

Lake Oswego Historic Cottage After Restorations | Hammer & Hand

After

H&H removed the dilapidated front entry and added a porch to match historic detail. The team also installed a new front door with addition of period-accurate brass screen door.

Back of Lake Oswego Historic Iron Workers Cottage | Hammer & Hand

On the back of the building the team removed the existing non-period porch and rebuilt it to match the historic style. H&H then added a historic rear door covered by a brass screen to match the front of the home.

Historic Lake Oswego Iron Workers Cottage Restoration | Hammer & Hand

H&H removed non-period windows and replaced them with two mulled together double hung windows with matching exterior storm windows. The team patched and replaced the siding, reworked the window trim and sills, re-roofed the home and added a copper chimney cap.

While this was a small project for us it’s an important piece to maintaining the built legacy of the region. Hammer & Hand began 20 years ago as a remodeler of historic homes and we’re proud to continue our work in preserving the area’s historic buildings.

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Queen Anne Home Remodel: Interior Walls Come Down, Performance Goes Up http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/queen-anne-home-remodel-interior-walls-come-down-performance-goes-up/ http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/queen-anne-home-remodel-interior-walls-come-down-performance-goes-up/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 15:07:53 +0000 http://hammerandhand.com/?p=6882 We’ve started work on a project in the Queen Anne neighborhood of Seattle, WA that we’re really excited about. The home, originally designed by a student of Frank Lloyd Wright, was built in 1912 and had about 40 years of neglect. In this neighborhood of Seattle it is common to tear down old homes like... Read more »

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We’ve started work on a project in the Queen Anne neighborhood of Seattle, WA that we’re really excited about. The home, originally designed by a student of Frank Lloyd Wright, was built in 1912 and had about 40 years of neglect. In this neighborhood of Seattle it is common to tear down old homes like this one to build a new modern structure in its place, but the new owners of this hundred-year-old home wanted to bring it back to it’s original glory while also making it habitable for their family. Together with architect David DiMarco, our team is currently working to update the home’s systems, envelope, and finishes while maintaining the home’s original profile and trim.

“It’s a beautiful iconic house in a stunning location,” said H&H CPHC Dan Whitmore. “Majority of the houses have been removed and replaced so it’s really nice to see this beautiful old structure be updated.”

 

Queen Ann Home Remodel in Seattle WA | Hammer & Hand

“The goal is to put it back to its original state, matching all exterior trim and siding and replacing windows, but we also have the opportunity to add better performance, insulation, and efficiencies to the home,” said Hammer & Hand Project Supervisor Alex Daisley.

The home has an extremely outdated radiant system and an inefficient electric boiler for the whole home. “It probably cost them $1,000 a month in the winter,” said Alex. “It’s a 400 amps service just to run the boiler.”

H&H is replacing the old boiler with a Triangle Tube Solo 110 boiler with 95% efficiency and replacing the outdated radiators with new radiant floor heating – even in the basement.

“Typically within an uninsulated slab basement we would not do this because it wouldn’t be efficient,” said Alex. “You’d be heating the ground as much as the house.”

Due to some historic settling, H&H will be able to install radiant floor heating in the basement as part of the process of leveling the concrete slab floor. The team will add aerogel in the areas with small gaps and more cost-effective EPS foam in places where there is a significant depth to insulate before applying radiant heat tubes and covering with Gyp-Crete for a level floor.

Basement Before Demo in Queen Ann Remodel | Hammer & Hand

The interior, a neglected warren of chopped up rooms, will be opened up into a more modern layout and completely refinished. The team has demoed the interior down to its studs and brick.

“We were pleasantly surprised when we removed all the finishes in the interior to find 2 x 6 framing on the exterior walls,” said Alex. “That’s quite rare for that time period – we would usually see 2 x 4 framing. That was a big win for being able to give it a better performing envelope.”

With almost six inches of cavity to fill with insulation instead of the expected 3 to 4 inches, the team will be able to create a warmer blanket for the home. Coupled with air sealing efforts, this will increase the structure’s performance and thermal comfort.

Exposed Framing in Queen Ann House Remodel | Seattle, WA | Hammer & Hand

While the majority of the interior has already been torn out, there are details that both architect and builder are being careful to protect. One example is the original tile around this upstairs fireplace:

Fireplace in Queen Ann Seattle Remodel | Hammer & Hand

Stay tuned for more updates, we’ll share more photos as the project progresses!

 

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ADU 101 http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/adu-101/ http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/adu-101/#comments Wed, 03 Jun 2015 21:57:08 +0000 http://hammerandhand.com/?p=6793 Maybe you’ve been watching a neighbor build what appears to be a matching, miniature version of their home in their backyard and were wondering what the deal is. Or perhaps you’ve been planning ahead for your retirement years and are looking for an aging-in-place option, or a way to fold multiple generations within one home... Read more »

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Maybe you’ve been watching a neighbor build what appears to be a matching, miniature version of their home in their backyard and were wondering what the deal is. Or perhaps you’ve been planning ahead for your retirement years and are looking for an aging-in-place option, or a way to fold multiple generations within one home while retaining some semblance of privacy and autonomy. Accessory Dwelling Units, or ADUs, are popping up all over the place in Portland and Seattle as people are looking for flexible housing scenarios or ways to augment revenue streams with renters.

ADUs are known by many names such as mother-in-law apartments, granny flats, or backyard cottages. They can take several shapes, but the uniting characteristic is a self-contained dwelling within, attached to, or adjacent to a single-family home. ADUs are generally accessible through a separate entrance and contain their own living, sleeping, kitchen, and bathroom facilities. The four main flavors of ADUs include:

  • Converting an existing living area
  • Finishing an existing basement or attic
  • Building a new freestanding structure
  • Adding to an existing structure, such as a detached garage

In addition to personal benefits, ADUs increase housing options in cities with scorching real estate markets —such as Portland and Seattle—in ways that are sensitive to preserving a neighborhood’s cultural fabric and character.

This sounds greatI want to build an ADU! How do I get started?

1. Do your homework.
Finding the right type of ADU for your home takes careful planning and research. The best path forward depends on getting to know your site, home, and city zoning codes and requirements intimately. Things to consider are the City’s regulations on square footage limits, entrance location, and building setbacks, and, if an exterior modification in Portland, Community Design Standards or historic overlays. Also consider potential impact on utilities, water or sanitary/storm sewers, and septic tanks.

Do you have enough room in your backyard to accommodate setback requirements for a freestanding ADU? If you’re adding to an existing 1924 historic home, can your galvanized plumbing handle the additional volume an ADU will bring? Can your existing electric service handle the extra load diverted to the ADU, or will you need to perform infrastructure upgrades or install new electric service altogether? These are examples of the myriad questions you must investigate and answer to be sure you won’t run into a roadblock midstream. For answers to the most common questions about things like square footage and setbacks, see our ADU FAQs for Portland and for Seattle. To continue your research, be sure to review the detailed information in Portland’s ADU Program Guide or Seattle’s Attached ADU and Backyard Cottage Permitting Guides.

Also, be aware that both Portland and Seattle require a building permit, and Portland requires a round of design review. Portland also loves its arboreal population and implemented a new tree code that you must consult before getting too starry eyed about removing that giant old Douglas Fir to make room for your sweet new secondary digs.

2. Pencil out the cost.
With the vision of your ADU taking shape, the next step is crunching numbers. It is essential to understand the cost implications of your addition and this can be a tricky calculation, with the stock answer being “it depends.” Size, type of ADU, level of infrastructure upgrades required, and quality of finishes will impact the final price. There isn’t a pat answer for how much it costs to build an ADU, but we tried to give a general idea in our blog post, How Much Does it Cost to Build an ADU?

3. Get an architect and builder on board.
Hammer & Hand has built many ADUs and can help you walk the site and flag any concerns. If you already have an architect and/or a set of plans, great! If you’re still hunting around for the right designer, though, we can refer you to an architect skilled at ADU design once we dial in your project goals and style. The architect can help you navigate through the city permitting and design review process, while we can connect you to partners that have written bank loans for ADUs and appraisers that understand the ADU process.

I’m ready to get started! Where can I start researching?

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Mind the Gap: What is a Rainscreen for Anyway? http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/mind-the-gap-what-is-a-rainscreen-for-anyway/ http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/mind-the-gap-what-is-a-rainscreen-for-anyway/#comments Fri, 29 May 2015 18:43:01 +0000 http://hammerandhand.com/?p=6733 Given their name, it’s no surprise that there’s some confusion about rainscreens and what they do. The “rain” and the “screen” refer to one important function of rainscreens: shielding a building from bulk water intrusion. But the term misses their other critically-important function: helping walls to dry out. It’s all about “minding the gap.” Rainscreens,... Read more »

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Given their name, it’s no surprise that there’s some confusion about rainscreens and what they do. The “rain” and the “screen” refer to one important function of rainscreens: shielding a building from bulk water intrusion. But the term misses their other critically-important function: helping walls to dry out.

It’s all about “minding the gap.”

Rainscreens, or ventilated siding, as I prefer to call them, consist of three layers: the cladding, the gap, and the weather resistant barrier (WRB).

rainscreenbpm1

Rainscreen detail from our Best Practices Manual.

The cladding’s job is to protect the WRB from the elements, such as rain and wind.

The WRB’s job (think Typar or Blueskin) is to protect the rest of the building from the elements, especially bulk water (rain) and air intrusion (wind).

When you add a gap between the cladding and the WRB you’ve got yourself a rainscreen. All it takes is a simple batten system. The simplicity of rainscreens belies their power, because that rainscreen cavity is a lifesaving detail for many buildings, especially in our damp, Cascadian climate.

Rain Screen Illustration | Hammer & Hand

Built properly, this cavity will:

  1. Introduce a capillary break between the cladding and the WRB, short circuiting the wicking of moisture between the two layers.
  2. Create a drainage plane between the two layers, allowing any bulk water that gets through the cladding to drain away harmlessly.
  3. Generate an air-moving stack effect (when ventilated at top and bottom) that creates hundreds of air changes per hour between the cladding and the WRB.

It should be noted that many rainscreens built today are not ventilated and therefore only serve the capillary break and drainage plane functions. Smart People say that works fine in some climates. But here in the Pacific Northwest we swear by ventilated cavities.

Rain Screen Detail from Portland and Seattle Contractor Hammer & Hand

This is particularly true when we’re building high performance structures. We’re making walls thicker, more airtight, and more thermally resistant, so suddenly we don’t have a bunch of air and heat passing through them like we used to. That’s a great thing for energy performance and comfort, but not for the drying capacity of walls. No matter how careful we are in detailing our walls and managing moisture in all its forms, we neglect drying capacity at our own – and our buildings’ – peril. We need to assume that walls will get wet and make sure they can dry well. Otherwise we’re tempting the gods of rot and building failure.

Ventilated rainscreens dramatically increase drying capacity. All that air moving across the face of a vapor-open WRB acts like a big fan, drawing moisture out of the wall assembly. The cladding loves it, too.

Ventilated=dry. And dry=happy.

Lest we get too happy with ourselves and our 21st century building innovations, the Romans knew about the virtues of ventilated wall cavities 2000 years ago. None other than Vitruvius wrote about them in his “Ten Books On Architecture.” We first learned about Vitruvius’ ventilated cavities during the keynote address by Mark R. Morden, Associate Principal at WJE, at AIA Seattle’s Building Envelope Forum last year. Joe Lstibruk cited Vitruvius again a couple weeks ago in his excellent “Vitruvius Does Veneers.”

Here are the quotes from the “Ten Books On Architecture” that Joe shared:

“…if a wall is in a state of dampness all over, construct a second thin wall a little way from it…at a distance suited to the circumstances…with vents to the open air…when the wall is brought up to the top, leave air holes there. For if the moisture has no means of getting out by vents at the bottom and at the top, it will not fail to spread all over the new wall.” (Book VII, Chapter IV)

“this we may learn from several monuments…in the course of time, the mortar has lost its strength…and so the monuments are tumbling down and going to pieces, with their joints loosened by the settling of the material that bound them together… He who wishes to avoid such a disaster should leave a cavity behind the facings, and on the inside build walls two feet thick, made of red dimension stone or burnt brick or lava in courses, and then bind them to the fronts by means of iron clamps and lead.” (Book II, Chapter VII)

Not to get carried away with the quotes from the classics, but “there is nothing new under the sun,” apparently. Vitruvius saw building failure in ancient Rome, and knew that ventilated cavities were a key way to avoid it.

So, in “minding the gap” in 2015, how big should the cavity be? While you can go smaller, our default at Hammer & Hand is ¾” or more, largely because we use 1×4 battens to create the gap. We’re always happy to go larger, and routinely do so, especially when we create crisscrossing battens for vertical siding conditions.

Rainscreen at Bottom of Wall | Hammer & Hand Best Practices Manual

Rainscreen detail for vertical siding condition.

(An aside: the size of battens can be played with for architectural effect, allowing the designer to easily move the exterior plane of a building outward – to hide the housing for movable exterior shades, for example.)

The key is to make sure that you always have a gap of ¼” or more at the top and bottom of the cladding (including at punched openings) so that you’re always setting up the stack effect in the rainscreen cavity. And tell your subs to keep their caulk guns away from that gap! If it ain’t ventilated, it ain’t drying your wall.

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First Floor Remodel Turns Chopped Up Rooms Into Communal Space http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/first-floor-remodel-turns-chopped-up-rooms-into-communal-space/ http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/first-floor-remodel-turns-chopped-up-rooms-into-communal-space/#comments Wed, 20 May 2015 16:00:39 +0000 http://hammerandhand.com/?p=6688 Hammer & Hand, architect Amy Griffith of Broken Box Designs, and interior designer Vida Shore teamed up to transform a first floor full of chopped up rooms into an open and connected space with a large kitchen perfect for entertaining. (Visit our kitchen remodeling page for more kitchen project examples, videos, and articles.) A new statement... Read more »

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Hammer & Hand, architect Amy Griffith of Broken Box Designs, and interior designer Vida Shore teamed up to transform a first floor full of chopped up rooms into an open and connected space with a large kitchen perfect for entertaining.

(Visit our kitchen remodeling page for more kitchen project examples, videos, and articles.)

Traditional Home Before & After Remodel | Hammer & Hand

A new statement piece staircase dominates the entry. H&H, Dyadic Iron Works, and Birds Eye Hardwood Floors built the staircase onsite. The team took down walls and added a substantial beam into the ceiling to create a larger kitchen and a more open, connected floor plan. Space from an unused dining room and den were reallocated to the kitchen.

Traditional Kitchen Remodel Before & After Photos | Hammer & Hand

A larger kitchen island with room to seat five replaced the previous small stovetop kitchen island. The team also added an updated stove and oven, more storage options, and a new wine bar complete with cooler and wine glass storage.

Traditional Kitchen Remodel Before & After | Hammer & Hand

Pocket dog gates (seen closed on right side, open on left side) give the homeowners the option to close off the kitchen from their two dogs when they need to.

Visit the Traditional Kitchen project page for more photos of this remodeling project.

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Remodeling Assessments http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/remodeling-assessments/ http://hammerandhand.com/field-notes/remodeling-assessments/#comments Tue, 19 May 2015 17:37:21 +0000 http://hammerandhand.com/?p=6857 There’s a lot to consider when embarking upon a remodeling project – whether it’s for a home you already own or one you’re considering purchasing. Does the home’s condition, design, and/or location make it particularly easy or particularly difficult to remodel? What rooms should be tackled first? Does an addition make sense? What would a... Read more »

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There’s a lot to consider when embarking upon a remodeling project – whether it’s for a home you already own or one you’re considering purchasing. Does the home’s condition, design, and/or location make it particularly easy or particularly difficult to remodel? What rooms should be tackled first? Does an addition make sense? What would a remodel cost, roughly? A remodeling assessment can help answer these questions and give you the information you need to move forward with your project.

Here is a little information about the remodeling assessment service Hammer & Hand offers:

WHAT TO EXPECT FROM A REMODELING ASSESSMENT

Your home assessment will include a one-hour site visit during which a Hammer & Hand project manager with many years of experience in residential construction will examine the home’s condition and design and assess the site and its constraints. We will then spend an hour preparing a report summarizing our assessment of the property’s potential from a contractor’s perspective. The report will include rough, “order of magnitude,” estimates of remodeling costs.

Our remodeling assessment service does not replace a traditional home inspection by a licensed inspector. If you do already have a home inspection report it can add valuable information to our assessment. We can also help you understand the cost implications of issues that your inspector may have uncovered.

COST

We charge $250 for the first home you would like assessed by Hammer & Hand. If you decide to complete your remodeling project with us, we will credit this fee back to you. If you would like for us to assess another home, we will provide a discount for the second (and subsequent) remodeling assessment.

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